Physiotherapy

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Becoming a respiratory therapist

Becoming a respiratory therapist

I often talk about physiotherapy, but do you also know there is a respiratory therapist also? If you plan to become a respiratory therapist, you need to know first, exactly what a respiratory therapist is.  A respiratory therapist is part of the medical team that aids patients that have respiratory problems.  As their title suggests, they provide therapy for the respiratory system.  The role of a respiratory therapist is to assist the physician by assessing, performing diagnostic tests, treating, evaluating, and even health teaching.  All interventions done by the respiratory therapist is done under the supervision of a physician. The requirements to become a respiratory therapist are minimal.  The first and foremost requirement is to got through respiratory therapist training. Respiratory therapist training does not really take that much time to finish.  There are vocational courses that you can take which can take as long as three to six months.  If you want to get more education, you can get a bachelor’s degree and even a master’s degree. To sign up for a respiratory therapist-training program, all you will need is a high school diploma. Schools that offer this course are medical schools, vocational schools and some colleges.  The armed forces also offer this type of training.   Once you are done with the training program, you can already find a job.  This will only get you to an entry-level position, but that still means that you can get a job.  If you are aiming for a higher position in this field, you should consider taking the respiratory therapist certification exam.  This may not be required in some states but this will give you a great chance in getting a good paying position. Aside from your educational attainment, you should also consider your physical health.  The jopb of a respiratory therapist is not to be taken lightly.  You will handle hundreds of patients at a daily basis and not all of them are located in one area.  Being physically fit will really help you do your job properly and efficiently.  Remember that you are dealing with sick patients and there is a good chance that you will get sick as well if you are not healthy.  Another thing about...

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Physiotherapy can restore Mobility after a Stroke

Physiotherapy can restore Mobility after a Stroke

A sudden numbness of the face, arm and leg on one side of the body, loss of speech, loss of balance and confusion are some of the warning signs of a stroke. Many people think that physiotherapy is only used for stiff or sore muscles and for sport injuries such as runner’s knee or chronic muscle injuries. Physiotherapy is also used for neurological conditions such as stroke as well as other conditions such as asthma and chronic bronchitis. The aim of physiotherapy for stroke patients for instance will be to help restore movement to the arms and legs and to help to restore normal body functions. Strengthening the Body Physiotherapists use therapeutic exercises and these have been designed to improve mobility and strengthen the affected area of the body. The types of therapy will depend on what parts of the brain were damaged during the stroke. Some stroke patients may require speech therapy, others occupational therapy and others physical therapy and strength training. Paralysis, or loss of muscle function are common after a stroke, and physiotherapy can help stroke survivors regain their strength and balance.   A Tailored Treatment Programme It can be devastating for anyone to have constant pain and not be able to perform physical functions or activities. Physiotherapists are trained to evaluate your musculoskeletal problem and then come up with a tailored treatment programme. They use a combination of exercise and manual therapy techniques. Physiotherapists always take time to get a complete understanding of your particular problem. They take down your complete history and a comprehensive evaluation of your problem. Their focus is to get stroke patients to learn the skills they will need to care for themselves after a stroke. The main aim of physiotherapy is to restore the body back to functioning property. Physiotherapists are trained health care professionals and you don’t need a doctor’s referral to see a...

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Physiotherapy – Management of Injuries and Disease

Physiotherapy – Management of Injuries and Disease

Physiotherapy dates back to ancient times when the Chinese used massage as a treatment. Since that time, the list of conditions that physiotherapy treats has grown. Today physiotherapy is used to treat common conditions such as back pain, asthma, tinnitus, heart disease, stroke patients, ulcers and many other ailments. To treat this different diseases or injuries, physiotherapy has been specialized so that it treats specific areas requiring attention – cardiovascular-, respiratory-, musculoskeletal as well as  neurological physiotherapy, demonstrating how physiotherapy treats many areas in the body. As a form of regulation, the Chartered Society of Physiotherapy was started in 1920. Treatment through the 1940’s mainly consisted of exercise, massage, and traction and later in the 1950s manipulative procedures to the spine were practiced. It was in the 1980’s with the explosion of technology and computers that electric stimulators and ultrasound were introduced. Recognizing Injuries During any kind of physical activity, the body is exposed to forces. Pre-existing weaknesses in the body, fatigue as well as skeletal muscle imbalance can all result in an injury. This is why it is so important that adequate protection and the correct gear should be worn for the particular needs of any sport. There are specific signs that can help with early diagnosis of an injury. The symptoms include pain, swelling, stiffness and numbness. Inflammation is the response of the tissues to injury and it is important to recognize these symptoms such as pain, swelling, redness, loss of function and increased temperature at the injury site. Seek Professional Opinions and Appropriate Treatment Physiotherapy today plays a very important role in medicine. You will find physiotherapy centers attached to hospitals with sophisticated equipment such as ultra sound therapy, traction equipment, wax bath therapy, infra-red radiation as well as exercise therapy equipment such as parallel bars, walking aids, strengthening equipment, stationary cycle and others. These centers treat soft tissue injuries, diseases of the bones and joints, post op joint replacement and much...

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